Connect with IEN

May 21 & 22, 2018 | Marcus Nanotech

Spring 2018: 2nd Annual IEN Technical Exchange Conference

 

REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS NOW CLOSED.

Join us at the Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN) for our annual Technical Exchange Conference. This 1.5 day event covers topics ranging from materials to architectures for tomorrow’s micro-/nano enabled electronic systems, while also providing one-on-one opportunities to engage with industry and academic technical leaders, GT faculty and students.

 
 

Monday May 21st

12:30 -  1:00 Registration
1:00   -  1:10
Welcome - Steven Cross, Executive Vice President for Research; Professor, H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering; Adjunct Professor, College of Computing & Ernest J. Scheller College of Business, Georgia Institute of Technology
1:10   -  1:30
IEN Host Overview, Event Agenda & Opening - Oliver Brand, Executive Director, Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology; Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
 
Session I - Emerging Paradigms of Computing
Session I Chair: Arijit Raychowdhury, ON Semiconductor Professor; Associate Professor,
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
1:30   -  2:15
James D. Meindl Distinguished Keynote Lecture
“Beyond von-Neumann Computing - A Hardware Perspective”
Spike Narayan, PhD., Director of Science & Technology, IBM Research - Almadea
2:20   -  2:50
“Design and Benchmarking of Beyond-CMOS Devices”
Azad J. Naeemi - Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
2:50   -  3:10 Break & Networking
3:15   -  3:45
“Challenges in Internet-of-Things and Cyber-Physical Systems”
Marilyn Wolf - Professor; Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar; Rhesa “Ray” S. Farmer, Jr., Distinguished Chair in Embedded Computing Systems, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
3:50   -  4:20
“Inverse Problems and Machine Learning in Modern Signal Processing”
Justin Romberg - Schlumberger Professor; Associate Director, Interdisciplinary Research Center for Machine Learning (ML@GT); Associate Chair for Research, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
4:20   -  4:50
“Communication-centric Computing for Deep Learning”
Tushar Krishna - Assistant Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
5:00   -  7:30 Student Poster Session, Reception & Networking
 

 

Tuesday May 22nd

8:00   -  8:45 Registration and Breakfast
8:45   -  8:55 Day 2 Event Start & Session Introduction - Eric M. Vogel, Deputy Director, Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology; Associate Director for Shared Resources of the Institute for Materials; Professor, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
 
Session II - Advanced Flexible Electronics for Biosensors and Bioelectronics
Session II Co-Chairs: W. Hong Yeo, Assistant Professor, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering & Bioengineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Suresh Sitaraman, Regent’s Professor; Morris M. Bryan, Jr. Professor, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
9:00   -  9:45
James D. Meindl Distinguished Keynote Lecture
“Soft Electronic and Microfluidic Systems for the Human Body”
John A. Rogers - Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University
9:50  - 10:20
“Sampling Interstitial Fluid from Skin Using a Microneedle Patch for Biomarker Detection”
Mark Prausnitz - Regents’ Professor; J. Erskine Love Jr. Chair, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Director of the Center for Drug Design, Development and Delivery, Georgia Institute of Technology
10:20 -10:35 Break & Networking
10:35 -11:05
“Non-Invasive Technologies for Physiological Sensing and Modulation”
Omer Inan - Assistant Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
11:05 -11:35
“Flexible Tech for Improving Hearing and Balance”
Pamela Bhatti - Associate Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
11:35 -12:05
“Designing Multi-Functional Electrodes for Next-Generation Energy Storage Devices”
Seung-Woo Lee - Assistant Professor, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
12:05-12:50 IEN Hosted Luncheon
12:55 - 1:00
Session III Introduction & Keynote Introduction
 
Session III - The Promises and Challenges of High Performance Electronics Everywhere
Session III Chair: Eric M. Vogel, Deputy Director, Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology; Associate Director for Shared Resources of the Institute for Materials; Professor, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
1:00  -  1:45
James D. Meindl Distinguished Keynote Lecture
“There is More than One Way to Expand on Computing”
Gregory Abowd - Regents’ Professor; J. Z. Liang Chair, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology
1:50  -  2:20
“Unlocking the Potential of 4D Printing with Printable Interactivity”
Tico Ballagas, Ph.D., Senior Manager, Immersive Experiences Lab, HP Labs
2:20  -  2:35 Break & Networking
2:40  -  3:10
“High Performance Electronics: Can Carbon Compete with Silicon?”
Bernard Kippelen - Joseph M. Pettit Professor; Director, Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics; Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
3:10  -  3:40
“Single-crystalline Semiconductors and Devices at a Massive Scale?”
Michael Filler - Traylor Faculty Fellow; Associate Professor, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
3:40  -  4:10
“3D-/4D-Printed Autonomous Wireless Flexible Modules for IoT, Smart Skin and Smart City Applications”
Manos Tentzeris - Ken Byers Professor in Flexible Electronics; Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
4:10  -  4:15 Conference Wrap Up - Oliver Brand & Eric M. Vogel
4:15  -  5:15 Laboratory Tours

 

 

REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS NOW CLOSED.

 

 

Speaker Bios

 

Session I Keynote: Spike Narayan

Dr. Narayan presently leads the Science and Technology Organization at IBM's Almaden Research Center. He is responsible for driving both fundamental and applied research in areas that include nanoscale science and engineering, advanced materials discovery and characterization, storage technologies and computational materials science. He is also responsible for emerging technologies in machine learning and machine intelligence. He is also responsible for driving new programs in the areas water, energy, environment and health care. Previously, Dr. Narayan has held several research and management positions in both Almaden and Watson Research Laboratories and has received many awards for his technical contributions. In addition, he is a Master Inventor within IBM Research and has over 50 US Patents to his credit. In addition, Dr. Narayan has contributed to the external engineering community by serving as the general and program chair for the IEEE/IEMT Symposium in 1999 and 2000, respectively, and chaired the DRAM Development Alliance Invention Board in 1999.Dr. Narayan earned his Bachelor of Technology in Metallurgy from Indian Institute of Technology, a Master of Science and a PhD in Metallurgy and Materials Engineering from Lehigh University.

 

Session II Keynote: John A. Rogers

Professor Roger's research seeks to understand and exploit interesting characteristics of 'soft' materials, such as polymers, liquid crystals, and biological tissues as well as hybrid combinations of them with unusual classes of micro/nanomaterials, in the form of ribbons, wires, membranes, tubes or related. The aim is to control and induce novel electronic and photonic responses in these materials; and also develop new 'soft lithographic' and biomimetic approaches for patterning them and guiding their growth. This work combines fundamental studies with forward-looking engineering efforts in a way that promotes positive feedback between the two. Current research focuses on soft materials for conformal electronics, nanophotonic structures, microfluidic devices, and microelectromechanical systems, all lately with an emphasis on bio-inspired and bio-integrated technologies. These efforts are highly multidisciplinary, and combine expertise from nearly every traditional field of technical study.

 

Session III Keynote: Gregory Abowd

Gregory D. Abowd (pronounced AY-bowd) is a Professor in the College of Computing at Georgia Tech. Dr. Abowd received the degree of B.S. in Mathematics and Physics in 1986 from the University of Notre Dame. He then attended the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom on a Rhodes Scholarship, earning the degrees of M.Sc. (1987) and D.Phil. (1991) in Computation from the Programming Research Group in the Computing Laboratory. His research interests lie in the intersection between Software Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction. Specifically, Dr.Abowd is interested in ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) and the research issues involved in building and evaluating ubicomp applications that impact our everyday lives. In the College of Computing, he is involved in research with faculty from the GVU Center and the Georgia Tech Broadband Institute.

Dr. Abowd directs the Ubiquitous Computing Research Group in the College of Computing and GVU Center. This effort started with the Future Computing Environments research group in 1995, and has since matured into a collection of research groups, including Dr. Abowd's own group. The FCE Group now consists of a federation of many faculty in the College of Computing. One of the major research efforts that Dr. Abowd initated is the Aware Home Research Initiative, now directed by Beth Mynatt, together with many faculty in the College of Computing, School of Psychology, and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

 

Azad J. Naeemi

Professor Naeemi received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Sharif University, Tehran, Iran in 1994, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. in 2001 and 2003, respectively. Prior to his graduate studies (from 1994 to 1999), he was a design engineer with Partban and Afratab Companies, both located in Tehran, Iran. He worked as a research engineer in the Microelectronics Research Center at Georgia Tech from 2004 to 2008 and joined the ECE faculty at Georgia Tech in fall 2008.

His research crosses the boundaries of materials, devices, circuits, and systems investigating integrated circuits based on conventional and emerging nanoelectronic and spintronic devices and interconnects. Dr. Naeemi serves as the leader of the beyond-CMOS benchmarking research at the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI) and the Semiconductor Technology Advanced Research Network (STARnet). He is the recipient of the IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS) Paul Rappaport Award for the best paper that appeared in IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices during 2007. He has received an NSF CAREER Award, an SRC Inventor Recognition Award, and several best paper awards at international conferences.

 

Marilyn Wolf

Marilyn Claire Wolf is the Rhesa “Ray” S. Farmer Distinguished Chair of Embedded Computing Systems and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Before joining Georgia Tech, Prof. Wolf was with Princeton University from 1989 to 2007 and with AT&T Bell Laboratories from 1984 to 1989. She received her B. S., M. S., and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University in 1980, 1981, and 1984, respectively. She co-founded Verificon Corporation in 2003. She has been elected to Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. She received the ASEE/CSE and HP Frederick E. Terman Award in 2003 and the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Education Award in 2006. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and ACM. 

 

Justin Romberg

Dr. Justin Romberg is the Schlumberger Professor and the Associate Chair for Research in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.  Dr. Romberg received the B.S.E.E. (1997), M.S. (1999) and Ph.D. (2004) degrees from Rice University in Houston, Texas.  From Fall 2003 until Fall 2006, he was a Postdoctoral Scholar in Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology.  He spent the Summer of 2000 as a researcher at Xerox PARC, the Fall of 2003 as a visitor at the Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions in Paris, and the Fall of 2004 as a Fellow at UCLA's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics.  In the Fall of 2006, he joined the Georgia Tech ECE faculty.  In 2008 he received an ONR Young Investigator Award, in 2009 he received a PECASE award and a Packard Fellowship, and in 2010 he was named a Rice University Outstanding Young Engineering Alumnus.  He is currently on the editorial board for the SIAM Journal on the Mathematics of Data Science, and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

 

Tushar Krishna

Tushar Krishna is an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech, with an Adjunct appointment in the School of Computer Science. He received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2014. Prior to that he received a M.S.E in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 2009, and a B.Tech in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi in 2007. Before joining Georgia Tech in 2015, Dr. Krishna worked as a post-doctoral researcher in the VSSAD Group at Intel, Massachusetts and at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Center.

Dr. Krishna's research spans the computing stack: from circuits/physical design to microarchitecture to system software. He has over two dozen publications in leading computer architecture conferences and journals and holds one patent.

 

Mark R. Prausnitz

Mark Prausnitz is Regents’ Professor and J. Erskine Love, Jr. Chair in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech. He earned a BS degree from Stanford University and PhD degree from MIT, both in chemical engineering. Dr. Prausnitz and colleagues carry out research on biophysical methods of drug delivery using microneedles, lasers, ionic liquids and other microdevices for transdermal, ocular and intracellular delivery of drugs and vaccines. Dr. Prausnitz teaches an introductory course on engineering calculations, as well as two advanced courses on pharmaceuticals. He has published more than 250 journal articles and has co-founded five start-up companies including Micron Biomedical and Clearside Biomedical.

 

Omer T Inan

Omer T. Inan received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2004, 2005, and 2009, respectively. He worked at ALZA Corporation in 2006 in the Drug Device Research and Development Group. From 2007-2013, he was chief engineer at Countryman Associates, Inc., designing and developing several high-end professional audio products. From 2009-2013, he was also a visiting scholar in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford. In 2013, he joined the School of ECE at Georgia Tech as an assistant professor, and was promoted to associate professor in 2018.

Dr. Inan is generally interested in designing clinically relevant medical devices and systems, and translating them from the lab to patient care applications. One strong focus of his research is in developing new technologies for monitoring chronic diseases at home, such as heart failure. He has received multiple major awards for his research, including the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award (2018), the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2018), and the Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award (2017). While an undergraduate at Stanford, he was the co-captain of the track and field team and a three-time All-American in the discus throw.

 

Pamela Bhatti

Pamela Bhatti is an Associate Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and an Adjunct Professor of Rehabilitative Medicine with the Emory School of Medicine. She serves as the Georgia Tech Research, Education & Career Development Director for the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance, and on the Faculty Steering Committee for the Georgia Tech CREATE-X program. Pamela received her B.S. in Bioengineering from the University of California, Berkeley (1989), her M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Washington (1993), and her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (2006) with an emphasis on biomedical applications of Micro-electro Mechanical Systems (Bio-MEMS). Before completing her Ph.D., Pamela’s industry experience includes Alza Corporation, Palo Alto, CA (1986-1990); Motorola Semiconductor, Austin, TX (1994-1995); and Microware Corporation, Des Moines, IA (1996-1997).

Pamela received the NSF CAREER Award (2011) and the Georgia Tech Class of 1934 Outstanding Interdisciplinary Activities Award (2017). Currently, she is an Associate Editor for the IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine; and the co-founder of Camerad Technologies (2016), a startup dedicated to increasing throughput and reducing errors in radiology imaging studies.

 

Seung Woo Lee

Seung Woo Lee received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Seoul National University with Summa cum laude in 2004 and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010. He joined the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology as an assistant professor in January 2013. Dr. Lee is an expert of electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems, which are the key enabling technologies to support fast-evolving consumer electronics and electric vehicles. Dr. Lee has published more than 40 articles in peer-reviewed journals with very high citations, showing the broad impact of this research on the research community of electrochemical systems. In particular, he has developed high-performance nanostructured organic electrodes using the surface redox reactions for advanced lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors. His work has been published in Nature Nanotechnology, Nature Communications, Energy & Environmental Science, and featured in many public news articles. Dr. Lee is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award (2018), the Samsung Global Research Outreach Award (2014), the Hanwha Advanced Materials Non-Tenure Faculty Award (2016), and the Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association (KSEA) Young Investigator Grant Award (2016).

Tico Ballagas - Ph.D., Senior Manager, Immersive Experiences Lab, HP Labs

Dr. Rafael ‘Tico’ Ballagas is a Senior Research Manager of the Immersive Experiences Lab at HP Labs. The lab's multidisciplinary research team is exploring the intersection of people, their practices, and the future of interaction.  Tico focuses on blended reality experiences across VR, AR and 3D printing. Prior to HP, Tico was the co-founder of Kindoma, the award-winning creator of the mobile communication services around shared activities that help families meaningfully connect with children when they can’t be together.  Tico’s work has been featured in popular press including the NY Times, and USA Today.

 

Bernard Kippelen

Dr. Kippelen was born and raised in Alsace, France. He studied at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg where he received a Maitrise in Solid-State Physics in 1985, and a Ph.D. in Nonlinear Optics in 1990. From 1990 to 1997 he was Chargé de Recherches at the CNRS, France. In 1994, he joined the faculty of the Optical Sciences Center at the University of Arizona. There, he developed a research and teaching program on polymer optics and plastic electronics. In August 2003, Dr. Kippelen joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology where his research ranges from the investigation of fundamental physical processes (nonlinear optical activity, charge transport, light harvesting and emission), to the design, fabrication and testing of light-weight flexible optoelectronic devices and circuits based on nanostructured organic materials. He currently serves as director of the Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, and as co-president of the Lafayette Institute, a major optoelectronics commercialization initiative that is based at Georgia Tech-Lorraine in Metz, France.

He currently holds 25 patents and has co-authored over 270 refereed publications and 14 book chapters. His publications have received over 20,000 citations and his h-index is 73 (Google Scholar). He served as chair and co-chair of numerous international conferences on organic optoelectronic materials and devices and as deputy editor of Energy Express. He was the founding editor of Energy Express.

 

Michael Filler

Dr. Filler is currently an Associate Professor and the Traylor Faculty Fellow in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Cornell University and Stanford University, respectively, prior to completing postdoctoral studies at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Filler has been recognized for his research and teaching with the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Georgia Tech Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award, CETL/BP Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award, and AVS Dorothy M. and Earl S. Hoffman Award. Dr. Filler also heads Nanovation, a forum to address the big questions, big challenges, and big opportunites of nanotechnology.

 

Manos Tentzeris

Professor Tentzeris was born and grew up in Piraeus, Greece. He graduated from Ionidios Model School of Piraeus in 1987 and he received the Diploma degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Magna Cum Laude) from the National Technical University in Athens, Greece, in 1992 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1993 and 1998.

He is currently a Professor with the School of ECE, Georgia Tech and he has published more than 550 papers in refereed Journals and Conference Proceedings, 4 books and 23 book chapters, while he is in the process of writing 1 book. He has served as the Head of the Electromagnetics Technical Interest Group of the School of ECE, Georgia Tech. Also, he has served as the Georgia Electronic Design Center Associate Director for RFID/Sensors research from 2006-2010 and as the GT-Packaging Research Center (NSF-ERC) Associate Director for RF research and the leader of the RF/Wireless Packaging Alliance from 2003-2006. Also, Dr. Tentzeris is the Head of the A.T.H.E.N.A. Research Group (20 students and researchers) and has established academic programs in 3D Printed RF electronics and modules, flexible electronics, origami and morphing electromagnetics, Highly Integrated/Multilayer Packaging for RF and Wireless Applications using ceramic and organic flexible materials, paper-based RFID’s and sensors, inkjet-printed electronics, nanostructures for RF, wireless sensors, power scavenging and wireless power transfer, Microwave MEM's, SOP-integrated (UWB, mutliband, conformal) antennas and Adaptive Numerical Electromagnetics (FDTD, MultiResolution Algorithms). He was the 1999 Technical Program Co-Chair of the 54th ARFTG Conference and he is currently a member of the technical program committees of IEEE-IMS, IEEE-AP and IEEE-ECTC Symposia. He was the TPC Chair for the IMS 2008 Conference and the Co-Chair of the ACES 2009 Symposium. He was the Chairman for the 2005 IEEE CEM-TD Workshop. He was the Chair of IEEE-CPMT TC16 (RF Subcommittee) and he was the Chair of IEEE MTT/AP Atlanta Sections for 2003. He is a Fellow of IEEE, a member of MTT-15 Committee, an Associate Member of European Microwave Association (EuMA), a Fellow of the Electromagnetics Academy, and a member of Commission D, URSI and of the the Technical Chamber of Greece. He is the Founder and Chair of the newly formed IEEE MTT-S TC-24 (RFID Technologies). He is one of the IEEE C-RFID DIstinguished Lecturers and he has served as one IEEE MTT-Distinguished Microwave Lecturers (DML) from 2010-2012. His hobbies include basketball, swimming, ping-pong and travel.